‘Why Torture Doesn’t Work: The Neuroscience of Interrogation’, by Shane O’Mara

Ever since the revelations of abuses at Abu Ghraib in 2003, the meaning of the euphemism “enhanced interrogation techniques” has been clear. Methods employed by the CIA in the years following 9/11 included face slapping, cramped confinement (with or without insects), food and sleep deprivation as well as waterboarding. At the time, the programme received full legal protection and was overseen by a team of psychologists, two of whom are now being sued over their involvement. More IN Non-Fiction In a meticulously researched book that reinforces the legal and ethical arguments against torture, Shane O’Mara, professor of experimental neuroscience at Trinity College, Dublin, focuses on its effects on human physiology. Those who defend torture argue that once you have destroyed someone psychologically, they will become compliant with an interrogator’s demands.…


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