Why Patient HM’s Mysteries Are Still Locked in His Brain

A slice of Henry Molaison’s brain. The Institute for Brain and SocietyLike many students of neuroscience, I first learned of patient HM in a college lecture. His case was so strange yet so illuminating, and I was immediately transfixed. HM was unable to form new memories, my professor explained, because a surgeon had removed a specific part of his brain. The surgery froze him in time. HM—or Henry Molaison, as his name was revealed to be after his death in 2008—might be the most famous patient in the history of brain research. He is now the subject of the new book, Patient HM: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets. An excerpt from the book in the New York Times Magazine, which details MIT neuroscientist Sue Corkin’s custody fight…


Link to Full Article: Why Patient HM’s Mysteries Are Still Locked in His Brain