Why It’s A Good Thing That A Machine Just Beat A Human At Go

View this image › Lee Sedol shakes hands with Demis Hassabis, CEO of DeepMind, after finishing the final match in Seoul. Jeon Heon-Kyun / Getty Images For a moment, it seemed like the machine might lose, again. Early into its fifth game of Go with top South Korean player Lee Sedol, and two days after chalking up a loss, Google’s AlphaGo made what its maker called yet another “bad mistake.”A second loss wouldn’t have changed the fact that the artificial intelligence–powered software had already won the five-match tournament overall. But in the final showdown, the program’s misstep still made for nail-biting gameplay (very slow nail-biting; the match lasted six hours). “Maybe Alpha is really just sort of remembering what happened in game four and getting a bit upset,” commentator and…


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