When the self represents the other: a new cognitive neuroscience view on psychological …

Abstract: There is converging evidence from developmental and cognitive psychology, as well as from neuroscience, to suggest that the self is both special and social, and that self-other interaction is the driving force behind self-development. We review experimental findings which demonstrate that human infants are motivated for social interactions and suggest that the development of an awareness of other minds is rooted in the implicit notion that others are like the self. We then marshall evidence from functional neuroimaging explorations of the neurophysiological substrate of shared representations between the self and others, using various ecological paradigms such as mentally representing one’s own actions versus others’ actions, watching the actions executed by others, imitating the others’ actions versus being imitated by others. We suggest that within this shared neural network the…


Link to Full Article: When the self represents the other: a new cognitive neuroscience view on psychological …