What AlphaGo’s Win Means for Your Job

Just last week, machines crossed a momentous milestone. Google’s AlphaGo, a computer algorithm, beat Go world champion Lee Sedol 4 to 1 in the ancient Chinese board game. Unlike Western chess, which consists of about 40 turns in a game, Go entails up to 200. Back in 1997, IBM IBM ‘s Deep Blue trumped chess Grandmaster Garry Kasparov by deploying a brute force approach—calculating all of the possible end games and then making an optimal choice for the next move. You can’t do this with Go. The permutation of outcomes on a 19-by-19 grid quickly compounds to a bewildering range—10761 to be exact—more than the total number of atoms of the entire observable universe. To compete, a machine needs to think more intuitively, more human-like. AlphaGo did just that. Before…


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