[Weekender] History of man-versus-machine matches

Smart computers directing chessmen to slash through bishops and knights to capture a chess grandmaster’s king no longer raise exclamations of awe. Computers’ ability to outwit professional chess players has long been accepted as a fact of life. But this was not always the case.Machines have made alarming progress since the first computers programmed to defeat amateur players in chess-like games were introduced in 1956. Slowly but steadily higher-ranked players were defeated, culminating in Deep Blue’s defeat of world champion Garry Kasparov in 1997.  (123rf) Since that first defeat of a world champion, machines have become even more efficient. Deep Blue was a computer specially designed for chess, and could compute 200 million moves per second. In 2006 the program Deep Fritz beat world champion Vladimir Kramnik on a regular…


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