The Economist explains Why artificial intelligence is enjoying a renaissance

THE TERM “artificial intelligence” has been associated with hubris and disappointment since its earliest days. It was coined in a research proposal from 1956, which imagined that significant progress could be made in getting machines to “solve kinds of problems now reserved for humans…if a carefully selected group of scientists work on it together for a summer”. That proved to be rather optimistic, to say the least, and despite occasional bursts of progress and enthusiasm in the decades that followed, AI research became notorious for promising much more than it could deliver. Researchers mostly ended up avoiding the term altogether, preferring to talk instead about “expert systems” or “neural networks”. But in the past couple of years there has been a dramatic turnaround. Suddenly AI systems are achieving impressive results…


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