Stanford study points to precisely positioned deep brain stimulation devices for Parkinson’s

For all the progress the field of neuroscience has made in tracking down the underlying pathology of neurodegenerative diseases, the brain remains a largely unexplored organ, composed of numerous “black box” modules that process information and lengthy tracts that, like cables, convey that processed information to distant regions, either igniting or suppressing further brain activity depending on the message being carried. Trying to untangle this circuitry is like trying to untangle the mass of wires coming out of the power strip behind your bed. Everything could, in principle, be connected to anything. Now, the marriage of two sophisticated brain-research technologies has spawned a clearer understanding of the brain circuitry whose faltering function underlies Parkinson’s disease. In a study published in Neuron, Stanford neuroscientist and bioengineer Jin Hyung Lee, PhD, and her colleagues obtained not just a higher-resolution map of two key…


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