Scientists show how we start stereotyping the moment we see a face

(iStock)Scientists have known for a while that stereotypes warp our perceptions of things. Implicit biases — those unconscious assumptions that worm their way into our brains, without our full awareness and sometimes against our better judgment — can influence grading choices from teachers, split-second decisions by police officers and outcomes in online dating. We can’t even see the world without filtering it through the lens of our assumptions, scientists say. In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Neuroscience, psychologists report that the neurons that respond to things such as sex, race and emotion are linked by stereotypes, distorting the way we perceive people’s faces before that visual information even reaches our conscious brains. “The moment we actually glimpse another person … [stereotypes] are biasing that processing in a way that conforms to our already existing expectations,”…


Link to Full Article: Scientists show how we start stereotyping the moment we see a face