Scientists find evidence of ‘anti-memories’, and it could change our understanding of neuroscience

At one point or another, we’ve all experienced something that we’d rather forget, so it’s a good thing our brains aren’t designed to hold onto every single memory forever. If they did, we might never be able to store new, more important information, such as the names of new people you meet or where you parked your car. But at the level of the neuron, what’s actually happening in our heads to make us forget what we once knew? New research suggests one of the ways we forget things is due to what can be described as ‘anti-memories’ – connections between neurons that generate the exact opposite pattern of electrical activity to that of the original memory. The ‘anti-memories’ hypothesis comes back to the idea that healthy brain function results…


Link to Full Article: Scientists find evidence of ‘anti-memories’, and it could change our understanding of neuroscience