Gating of hippocampal activity, plasticity, and memory by entorhinal cortex long-range inhibition

Jayeeta Basu1,†,‡, Jeffrey D. Zaremba1,*, Stephanie K. Cheung1,*,†, Frederick L. Hitti1, Boris V. Zemelman2, Attila Losonczy1, Steven A. Siegelbaum1,‡ 1Department of Neuroscience, Kavli Brain Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, USA. 2University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA. ↵‡Corresponding author. E-mail: jayeeta.basu{at}nyumc.org (J.B.); sas8{at}columbia.edu (S.A.S.) ↵* These authors contributed equally to this work. ↵† Present address: Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, NYU Neuroscience Institute, New York University School of Medicine, 450 East 29th Street, New York, NY 10016, USA. Fine-tuned information flow in the brain In addition to providing well-characterized excitatory inputs, the entorhinal cortex also sends long-range inhibitory projections to the hippocampus. Basu et al. described this input in detail and characterized its role for learning and memory. Multimodal sensory stimuli…


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