From feeling to reacting: A 2-way street between temperature sensing, brain activity Nagoya …

IMAGE: A tracking microscope was used to study both the movement and AFD neuron response of C. elegans to thermal stimuli. view more Nagoya, Japan – When the surrounding environment makes us uncomfortable, we are inclined to move to a more agreeable one. Studies have shown that animals do the same. They organize sequences of movements to migrate to preferred environments. Understanding how environmental information is converted to sensory information in the brain is vital for a deeper understanding of animal behavior and human perception. However, not much is known about this process. The movement of Caenorhabditis elegans–or roundworm–in response to temperature changes has been extensively studied. Deletion of a pair of sensory neurons, known as AFD, severely hindered the worms’ ability to react to an increase or decrease in temperature,…


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