Dopamine cross-sensitization between psychostimulant drugs and stress in healthy male volunteers

Citation: Translational Psychiatry (2016) 6, e740; doi:10.1038/tp.2016.6Published online 23 February 2016L Booij1,2,3,10, K Welfeld3,10, M Leyton3,4,5, A Dagher5, I Boileau6, I Sibon7, G B Baker8, M Diksic5, J-P Soucy5, J C Pruessner9, E Cawley-Fiset3, K F Casey2 and C Benkelfat3,5 Top of page Introduction Stress is a key contributing factor in the development and exacerbation of chronic relapsing neuropsychiatric disorders, including addiction and psychosis. One potentially involved process is ‘sensitization’; that is, following repeated exposure to stressors and/or psychostimulant drugs, some effects can become progressively greater.1, 2, 3 In susceptible individuals, these enhanced responses have been proposed to influence illness onset and relapse. 4, 5, 6, 7 In animals, ‘sensitization’ to psychostimulants is subject to cross-sensitization with stress.8, 9 For instance, in rodents, repeated exposure to psychostimulants increases the ability of stressors to precipitate motor activity, drug self-administration and dopamine (DA) release.10, 11 Conversely, exposure…


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