Brain Receptors for Hunger Hormone Control Food Intake, Neuroscience Researchers Find

ATLANTA—Activating receptors in the brain for the body’s hunger hormone increases food-related behaviors, such as gathering, storing and consuming food, a finding that has implications for the treatment of obesity, according to researchers at Georgia State University. Media Contact LaTina Emerson Public Relations Specialist    Georgia State University 404-413-1353lemerson1@gsu.edu Their study suggests that stimulating brain receptors for ghrelin, a hormone that increases appetite, by injecting ghrelin into the brain is necessary and adequate to increase appetitive and consummatory behaviors in Siberian hamsters. However, activating ghrelin receptors in other parts of the body isn’t required to achieve these food-related behaviors. The researchers also found that blocking brain receptors for grehlin neutralizes the hormone’s effect on food intake. The findings, published in The American Journal of Physiology – Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology,…


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