An AI computer learned how to beat almost anyone at chess in 72 hours

The computer’s domination over humanity may start at the chessboard. Since IBM’s Deep Blue beat chess master Garry Kasparov in 1997—the first time a computer beat a human at chess under tournament rules—computers have gotten faster and faster. But even the fastest modern computers are using the same technique Deep Blue employed—analyze every possible move as quickly as possible—whereas a human chess master might only consider a few moves at any given moment. A new artificial intelligence program, however, might have figured out how to let computers think more like we do when it comes to chess. Matthew Lai, a computer scientist at University College London, recently published his master’s thesis, which demonstrated a machine learning system—called Giraffe, after this cartoon about evolution—that can learn to play at the International…


Link to Full Article: An AI computer learned how to beat almost anyone at chess in 72 hours