Across decades, a girl unravels the mystery of her computer expert father

Comments Print By Karen Campbell Globe Correspondent  July 28, 2016 Liz Moore’s captivating new page-turner, “The Unseen World,” is a wry, gentle coming-of-age story and an intriguing glimpse into the development of artificial intelligence and virtual reality, both early on and as envisioned for the future. It is also an incisive, insightful, and compassionate examination of the complexities of family and identity. The novel’s endearing protagonist is Ada Sibelius, whom we first meet in the 1980s as a shy, awkward, and brilliant 12-year-old being home-schooled by her single father, David. The head of a prestigious computer lab at the fictional Boston Institute of Technology (also known as BIT, in a nod to the real-life institution across the Charles), David doesn’t so much home-school his young prodigy as “lab-school” her. Ada…


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